Monthly Archives: October 2017

Eliminating Barriers To Colon Cancer Screening

There is good news for those concerned about colon cancer. Physicians know that colon cancer screening saves lives. Yet an estimated 148,000 Americans, both women and men, are diagnosed with colorectal cancer each year, and every year approximately 55,000 will die-the nation’s second deadliest cancer. Yet, it’s believed most of these deaths could be prevented through proper screening.

However, experts from the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) warn that too few Americans are getting screened. Colorectal screening rates remain very low, even though Medicare and many private plans pay for screening tests.

Despite increasing public awareness of colon cancer screening tests through the efforts of Katie Couric and others, many people continue to face obstacles to screening. Even Medicare beneficiaries, for whom incidence and death from the disease are highest, encounter problems with access to screening colonoscopy.

Congress Can Help

“Pending legislation in the U.S. Congress, such as the Colon Cancer Screen for Life Act (S.1010/ H.R. 1632), promises to remove Medicare’s barriers to screening,” says ACG President Dr. Jack A. DiPalma of Mobile, Alabama. “But only one small improvement, the waiver of the Medicare deductible, was approved for 2006, so much remains to be done.”

Research indicates that colon cancer arises from precancerous growths or polyps that grow in the colon. When detected early, these growths or polyps can be removed, actually preventing the development of colon cancer.

“With improved use of colon cancer screening, we can save lives,” adds Dr. DiPalma.

The College currently recommends colonoscopy every 10 years beginning at age 50 for average-risk individuals as the preferred screening strategy to prevent colon cancer.

For patients with higher risk factors such as a family history of colon cancer or a previous personal history of polyps, and for African Americans, ACG recommends earlier and/or more frequent screening with colonoscopy.

One Simple Test Can Help You Fight The Battle Against Colon Cancer

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for both women and men. This disease surpasses both breast and prostate cancer in mortality, second only to lung cancer in the number of cancer deaths. Despite the fact that it is highly preventable, it is estimated that 148,610 new cases of colorectal cancer will be diagnosed and 55,170 people will die from the disease in 2006. However, when detected and treated early, colorectal cancer has a five-year survival rate of greater than 90 percent. For that reason, routine screening is vital in the prevention and detection of this deadly disease.

CRC Screening

According to the American Cancer Society, “beginning at age 50, both men and women at average risk for developing colorectal cancer should follow one of these five testing schedules:

• yearly fecal occult blood test (FOBT)* or fecal immunochemical test (FIT)

• flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years

• yearly FOBT* or FIT plus flexible sigmoidoscopy every five years**

• double-contrast barium enema every five years

• colonoscopy every 10 years

* For FOBT, the take-home multiple sample method should be used.

** The combination of yearly FOBT or FIT plus flexible sigmoid-oscopy every five years is preferred over either of these options alone.

All positive tests should be followed up with colonoscopy.”

New Test

One simple, easy-to-use test is Quidel’s QuickVue® iFOB test. QuickVue iFOB is a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) where the sample is collected by the patient in the privacy of his/her home and mailed to the physician for testing. The test detects the presence of blood in stool specimens, an indication of a number of gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer.

The QuickVue iFOB test requires only one specimen. Because it is specific to human hemoglobin (blood), there are no dietary restrictions and only certain medication restrictions, distinguishing it from guaiac-based tests that have onerous restrictions. In fact, according to the American Cancer Society, in comparison with guaiac-based tests, commonly known as Fecal Occult Blood Tests (FOBTs), immunochemical tests are more patient-friendly.

“We are committed to saving lives through early screening and detection of colon cancer,” said John Tamerius, Ph.D., Vice President, Clinical and Regulatory Affairs, Quidel Corporation. “We believe our unique, patient-friendly sample collection device makes this screening process as easy as possible for the patient.”

Despite these recent advancements in CRC screening, less than 50 percent of people age 50 or older have had a recent test. There appears to be a significant opportunity for CRC prevention since it takes an average of 10 years for cancerous cells to develop. Therefore, if you’re over the age of 50 or have a family history of colon cancer, you should speak with your physician about taking an iFOB test. The test is simple, takes a minimal amount of time and may help save your life.

‘Buddy Bracelet’ Spreads Awareness of Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is 90 percent preventable and 90 percent treatable when detected early, yet it continues to be the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States.

To help spread the message about the importance of early detection, the Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation and its 54 partners have joined together to celebrate National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month by introducing the “Buddy Bracelet,” a unique and powerful way to promote public awareness of the disease.

“Today, in a sea of colored bracelets, the blue Buddy Bracelet stands out by creating a clever way for people to take their health into their own hands,” said Carolyn Aldigé, president and founder of the Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation. “The bracelet spreads the message that colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable and beatable.”

Launched in 2004 to celebrate National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, the Buddy Bracelet reminds those who wear it to get screened for colorectal cancer. After the person is screened, he or she gives the bracelet to a family member, friend or colleague, passing on the powerful message about talking with a health care professional about colorectal cancer. The bracelet then is transferred from that person to another person and so on.

The bracelet’s theme, “Wear it, share it, because you care,” is a message that could save thousands of lives.

People at average risk for

colorectal cancer should get screened starting at age 50. Younger people can help support the Buddy Bracelet effort by learning about their families’ medical histories, starting a dialogue about colorectal cancer with their health care professionals and reminding loved ones to get screened.

Staging Colon Cancer

When a doctor wants to evaluate the progress of colon cancer of one of his patients he or she uses a method called Staging. This method is about finding out to what extent the tumor (colon cancer) has spread to the other regions of the patients body. Once the doctors figured out in what stage the colon cancer is, they will develop the best course of action or treatment.

At this point in time the system that is most commonly used for the staging process of colon cancer is called the American Joint Committee on Cancer’s (AJCC) TNM staging system. Simply put this system used for staging places the patients into one of four stages.

Stage 0

Stage 0 also known as carcinoma in situ or colorectal cancer. In this stage the colon cancer has been detected in the innermost lining of the colon.

Stage I

In this stage the colon cancer has already begun to spread. But the cancer is still in the inner lining of the rectum or colon. In this stage the colon cancer has not reached the outer walls of the colon yet. Stage I is also known as Duke A or colorectal cancer.

Stage II

In this stage the colon cancer spread more deeply into or through the colon or rectum. Possibly the colon cancer may have affected other tissue as well. In this stage the colon cancer hasn’t reached the Lymph nodes (bean-sized structures which can be found in the entire body that helps the body fight all kinds of infections and diseases. Stage II is also known as Duke B or colorectal cancer.

Stage III

When you are in this stage the colon cancer has now spread to the Lymph nodes although it hasn’t spread to nearby parts of the body. Stage III is also known as Duke C or colorectal cancer.

Stage IV

In this stage the colon cancer has spread through the Lymph node system to other nearby tissue. This is most commonly called metastasis. The organs that most likely are affected are the lungs and liver. Stage IV is also known as Duke D or colorectal cancer.

Recurrent Colon Cancer or Cancerous Cells

When doctors talk about recurrent colon cancer they mean that cancerous cells that have already been treated have returned. These cancerous cells could possibly have returned as colorectal cancer but they might as well return in any other part of the body too.

Risks of Colon Cancer in Women and Men

Cancer occurs when something goes wrong with this system, causing uncontrolled cell division and growth. Colon cancer is cancer of the large intestine (colon), the lower part of your digestive system. Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called adenomatous polyps. Rectal cancer is cancer of the last 6 inches of the colon. Together, they’re often referred to as colorectal cancers.

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer killer overall and third most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States in both males and females. Who is at risk for colorectal cancer. Men tend to get colorectal cancer at an earlier age than women, but women live longer so they catch up with men and thus the total number of cases in men and women is equal. Women diagnosed with uterine or ovarian cancer before age 50 are at increased risk of colorectal cancer. Woman with a personal history of breast cancer have only a very slight increase in risk of colorectal cancer. The average age to develop colorectal cancer is 70 years, and 93% of cases occur in persons 50 years of age or older. You have a higher risk for colon cancer if you have:

Cancer elsewhere in the body.
Colorectal polypsCrohn’s disease
Family history of colon cancer
Personal history of breast cancer
Ulcerative colitis.

What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer. Symptoms of colorectal cancer vary depending on the location of the cancer within the colon or rectum, though there may be no symptoms at all. The most common presenting symptom of colorectal cancer is rectal bleeding. Cancers arising from the left side of the colon generally cause bleeding, or in their late stages may cause constipation, abdominal pain, and obstructive symptoms. On the other hand, right-sided colon lesions may produce vague abdominal aching, but are unlikely to present with obstruction or altered bowel habit. Other symptoms such as weakness, weight loss, or anemia resulting from chronic blood loss may accompany cancer of the right side of the colon.

If your doctor learns that you do have colorectal cancer, more tests will be done to see if the cancer has spread. Colonoscopy is currently the only test recommended for colorectal cancer screening in average-risk persons at 10 year intervals. Colonoscopic surveillance (also called screening colonoscopy) needs to be available at more frequent intervals for individuals at high risk for colon cancer (for instance, those with a personal history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps; family history of colorectal cancer; non-hereditary polyposis; colorectal cancer; or a pre-disposing condition such as inflammatory bowel disease.

The first step to avoiding this ailment is prevention with regular tests at the doctor, but there are other ways of getting around this disease in between checkups. Nevertheless, it appears that increasing the fiber content in the Western diet would be useful in the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. It is recommended that physical activity messages promoting at least 30-45 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity on most days of the week be included in primary prevention interventions for cancer. The population prevalence for meeting proposed physical activity criteria for colon cancer prevention is low and much lower than that related to the more generic public health recommendations.

Our bodies need lots of calcium and not only for building strong bones. Colon cancer prevention is one of the most exciting uses for calcium. However, instead of using calcium supplements, this study relied on low-fat dairy products to supply 1,200mg calcium per day. Investigators found this amount of calcium decreased the incidence of changes in the cells lining the colon, which is often seen in the initial stages of colon cancer. A significant protective factor is adequate dietary calcium intake during the period of maximum growth (ages 9 and 25 y), so that proper peak bone mass is achieved by age 20and 30 y and maintained until mid-life, with only slow bone loss in the following years. As already noted, dietary surveys indicate a significant gap between the recommended calcium intake and the actual intake in the United States in the critical years of adolescence and young adulthood and later in life. In addition, several large-scale, recent studies in humans indicate a role for increased dietary calcium in reducing colon cancer risk, as briefly discussed below.

Both men and women are equally at risk for colorectal cancer. Men over the age of 50 and women over 55 should have this test on an annual basis to detect colon cancer early. Yet colorectal cancer is the third most common malignancy in women after breast and lung cancer. Incidence is slightly higher in men than women, and is highest in African American men. It is believe that the time has come for a full scientific review of cereal-grain enrichment with calcium and vitamin D as a low-cost, safe, and useful route for the reduction of osteoporosis and colon cancer in the United States in both men and women.

What is colon cancer&treatment

One 6-letter word that smacks fear into the hearts and minds of many people in this day and age is the word ‘Cancer’. I would venture to say that this fear is most likely the result of a lack of knowledge of the disease. If you fall into that category, then hopefully the information that you receive here will put you at ease, as well as inspire you to find out
more from the vast storehouse of information that is available.

What is cancer?
Briefly, it is brought about when cells in our body do not mature. A normal healthy cell has a specific function to perform in the body. These immature cells are not performing their proper function, and so remain undeveloped. They then begin feeding on the body, stealing nutrition in an attempt to grow, and thus become cancerous. How quickly they grow out of control, causing the spread of the cancer, is dependant on the strength of an individuals natural defenses against these cells.

Every day, every one of us is exposed to innumerable cancer-causing agents. It has been established that approximately 70 to 80 percent of all cancers occur as a result of the food we eat, the air we breathe and the water we drink, as well as lifestyle and environmental factors. Approximately one third of deaths from cancer are related to dietary factors. Our bodies have natural defense mechanisms to battle these ‘agents’, but in many cases, because of neglecting proper nutrition and exercise, and abusing our bodies by loading them with even more harmful agents, then these defenses are weakened or overwhelmed, and cancer begins to gain a foothold in the body.

Colon cancer, or colorectal cancer as it’s sometimes known as is cancer which starts in the digestive, or gastrointestinal (GI) system. A colon’s primary responsibility is to process food into energy and remove all waste materials. As with any cancer, the disease begins when cancerous cells begin to grow out of control compared to normal, non-cancer cells. Every cancer is different depending on where it occurs, so colon cancer will generally progress at a different rate, cause different
symptoms, and respond to different medical treatments. Although there are some specific treatment methods for the different body areas affected, there are some basic principles, which are common to all cancer forms. .

Perhaps you’re reading this article because you are suffering form cancer right now, or perhaps you know someone else who is. Maybe you’re just looking for information to help avoid it in the future. Whatever your circumstances are, I urge you to imprint the following statement deeply into your mind – Cancer Can Be Conquered! However, with the rapid advances that have been made with modern medicine, as well as the rediscovery of ancient natural therapies that are built upon good nutrition and sound principles of daily living, it can be stated with confidence. I’ll say it again – Cancer Can Be Conquered.

The first victory over colon cancer is it must be made on the battlefield of the mind. It is here that fear seeks to control and overwhelm you. I would encourage you to make a firm decision to stand up against this giant of fear, and to reach beyond it to find hope and faith. There is a statement that is made that says, ‘You shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free.’ So, the first step to being set free from the enemy of fear is to find out the truth concerning cancer. The lie has for too long been that cancer is the end of the road – incurable.

The truth is just the opposite. Realize that and set yourself free from the numbing fear of cancer that wants to defeat you. Say that you are more than enough to fight against it. Make a firm decision that you are going to defeat with you will power.

Most of the time, colon cancer spreads slowly over a period of years, and colon cancer can effect any section or layer of your colon. The key to have a good prognosis with colon cancer is to catch the disease early. If a doctor can find and remove a colon cancer polyp in the early stages, then there is a much better chance of recovery. Risk factors of colon cancer include age, family history, smoking, ethnicity, diet, lack of exercise, alcohol, and history of other bowel disease. If you are in an at-risk category, then it is important to get a colon cancer screening test. If you are unsure with you fit the profile, talk to ask primary physician first.

Our supplementary diets have a positive effect. They are natural and have no side effects. We should also be positive in that certain foods greatly strengthen and aid our built in immune system in the ongoing battle against our healthy body cells. We should be negative in that there are certain foodstuffs that have been shown to be harmful, and to greatly speed up the growth and spread of cancer cells. It thus becomes imperative that we learn what foodstuffs are immune boosters, and which ones weaken it.

Besides our diet, the next major contributing factor to consider is the environment we are living in. More and more vehicles are being produced, and more and more factories built, pumping out toxic gases into the atmosphere, causing a subtle build-up of toxins in our
bodies, wearing down the ability of the immune system to cope. Unfortunately, we have very little control over these environmental effects, other than to relocate to a safer
environment, which is not always possible. This then makes it even more vital for us to build up our immune systems with the right foods, and supplementary minerals and vitamins.

One last consideration to take note of is that any cancer is more easily defeated if caught in its early stages. Therefore it is very important to have regular medical check-ups, even if we are feeling fine. Then too, learn what are the telltale symptoms for the various cancers, and at the first evidence of anything suspicious, get it checked out by your doctor.

Colon cancer has become the 3rd most common form of Cancer in men and 4th in women and is the second leading cause of death among cancers. If it is left untreated, it can spread and affect other parts of the body, such as the liver and lungs, causing new tumors to form in these organs. This process of the cancer spreading is called metastasis. Once metastasis sets in, the chances of curing the cancer completely are slim.

Therefore early detection is key to making a full recovery. The removal of benign (non-cancerous) colon polyps can prevent colon cancer. Colon polyps initially appear in benign form. Over time, benign colon polyps can undergo chromosome damage to become cancerous. There is no definitive cause for colon cancer, but diets high in fat are believed to play a role in the formation. Other factors include a family history of colon cancer, polyps in the large intestine and ulcerative colitis.

Colon cleansing is preventative health care

Colon cleansing is preventative health care, rather than a treatment for a disease. It is critical because it helps to detoxify your body of all the unnecessary and unwanted toxins that build up in your body. It is also regarded as a safe and alternative method to treat many of our symptoms and problems. Colon cleansing is a procedure of cleansing the body, resulting in the release of toxins, poisons, carcinogens and free radicals. Natural colon cleansers are also available and if you think you don’t have much time and money for clinic sessions, you can do colon cleansing at home.

Colon cleansing is the first step on the road to recovery. Detoxification is necessary to rid our body of toxins that accumulate as a result of an unhealthy diet, environmental pollution and chemicals, and a constant use of antibiotics. Cleansing your body with an effective, all natural colon treatment is a good way to approach parasites cleansing, weight gain, IBS, severe gas and bloating, etc. Cleansing, also called detoxification, is our body’s normal process of elimination, a function that occurs daily through our colon, liver, kidney, lungs, lymph and skin. Cleansing reactions are part of cleansing and are not the same as “side effects” normally associated with medication.

Naturally, the colon in your digestive system is responsible for holding wastes. Natural colon cleansing involves a cleansing diet, which consists of some efficient herbs that are known for killing certain harmful parasites and worms. Body detox is one of the effective way to keep us
healthy, help our digestion system and put all the toxins out of the body. Natural colon cleansing involves taking a balanced diet and additionally,
a few herbal supplements that help kill the harmful bacteria and in removing excess of toxins.

Natural colon cleansing is a great way to help restore health to this vital organ of your digestive system. Natural herbal colon cleansers makes the process of colon detox very smooth and thus helps us to maintain our body in a much more effective way. More often than not, natural colon cleansing means following a colon cleansing diet along with taking some colon cleansing supplements which may include herbs which are known to kill parasites and worms, contain digestive enzymes, contain probiotics
(beneficial bacteria), contain herbs that stimulates liver, gallbladder and intestines, also psyllium husk or seeds, Cascara Sagrada, or flax seeds, or
slippery elm, and others.

Cancer of the colon and rectum (colorectal cancer) is a malignant tumor arising from the inner wall of the large intestine. Cancer affecting the colon and/or rectum is diagnosed in more than 140,000 Americans each year. Cancer of the colon and rectum is the third most common cause of cancer death in women (after lung and breast cancers) and the third most common cause of cancer death in men (after lung and prostate cancers). This is probably one of the reason as to why one can find literally find thousands of magazines and journals which gives a detailed analysis on the dangers of deadly toxins that can inturn lead to the building up of parasites and ultimately leads on to colon cancer.

Colon cleansing herbs are of paramount importance to the health of the body as they can eliminate the many toxins in the body system which the body cannot normally expel. Colon cleansing herbs are available in two different forms — namely, a pre-made formula or just as single herbs. Colon cleansing herbs are simply mixtures of herbs that have been found to help expedite the removal of waste from a person’s body in an efficient way.

Caregivers Play Key Role in Disease Management of Older Colon Cancer Patients

Colon cancer patients who are 65 and older may benefit from a caregiver’s involvement, and caregivers may ultimately have a major impact on patients’ disease management, according to a survey of oncologists commissioned by the Alliance for Aging Research.

Ninety percent of oncologists feel that caregivers have a moderate to major impact on the decision-making process. Unfortunately, only about 64 percent of colon cancer patients in this age group have caregivers’ support.

“Physicians should encourage patients to enlist a caregiver and involve them in the treatment decision-making process,” said Dr. Stuart Lichtman, associate attending physician at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

More than half of oncologists who agree that colon cancer patients 65 and older have a more difficult time managing their disease than younger patients also agree that these patients are generally less proactive about researching available treatment options. Seventy-seven percent said that such patients experienced better disease outcomes with a caregiver’s involvement due to increased communication. Additionally, caregivers play an important role in providing emotional support, participating in doctors’ visits and in decisions about disease management options and providing transportation to appointments.

“It is clear that caregivers are key to ensuring that colon cancer patients 65 and older receive the best care,” said Daniel Perry, executive director of Alliance for Aging Research. “Since managing colon cancer can be a complicated and confusing process especially for the aging population, a caregiver, whether a spouse, child, friend or neighbor, should be actively involved.”

“Crossing Jordan” star Miguel Ferrer, who lost his father, José Ferrer, to colon cancer, is partnering with the Alliance for Aging Research in a program called “Caring for the Aging,” to educate colon cancer patients and caregivers about the importance of active involvement in the treatment of the disease. This awareness program is sponsored by sanofi-aventis.

“The involvement of my stepmother helped ease my father’s decision-making process as he went down a difficult path,” Ferrer said. “I encourage all caregivers and family members to become actively involved and ask the right questions to ensure the best possible outcomes for their loved one.”